Soil erosion by overland flow and raindrop splash on three mountain soils
Read Online
Share

Soil erosion by overland flow and raindrop splash on three mountain soils by Eugene E. Farmer

  • 963 Want to read
  • ·
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Soil erosion -- Idaho.,
  • Soil erosion -- Utah.,
  • Soil erosion -- Great Basin.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 14.

StatementEugene E. Farmer and Bruce P. Van Haveren.
SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper INT -- 100.
ContributionsVan Haveren, Bruce P., Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
The Physical Object
Pagination14 p. :
Number of Pages14
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16022863M

Download Soil erosion by overland flow and raindrop splash on three mountain soils

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Soil erosion by overland flow and raindrop splash on three mountain soils. Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File. Soil and water being splashed by the impact of a single raindrop.. Rainfall, and the surface runoff which may result from rainfall, produces four main types of soil erosion: splash erosion, sheet erosion, rill erosion, and gully erosion is generally seen as the first and least severe stage in the soil erosion process, which is followed by sheet erosion, then rill erosion . Soil erosion by overland flow and raindrop splash on three mountain soils / (Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, ), by Eugene E. Farmer, Bruce P. Van Haveren, and Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah) (page images at HathiTrust). by raindrop impact and shallow surface flow. It results in loss of the finest soil particles that contain most of the available nutrients and organic matter in the soil. Soil loss is so gradual that the erosion usually goes unnoticed, but the cumulative impact accounts for large soil losses. Soils most vulnerable to sheet erosion are overgrazed.

Splash erosion is generally seen as the first and least severe stage in the soil erosion process, which is followed by sheet erosion, then rill erosion and finally gully erosion (the most severe of the four).: 60– In splash erosion, the impact of a falling raindrop creates a small crater in the soil, ejecting soil particles. Download Citation | Soil degradation and overland flow as causes of gully erosion on mountain pastures and in forests | In the European Limestone Alps, “Lithic Borofolists”, i.e. soils in a. increasing concentration of the overland flow. This increases for two soils, each with three aggregate size distributions. The mechanics of raindrop splash erosion of soil were Author: Karl Auerswald. Soil particles must be dislodged first from their mass before they can be splashed, rolled, slid or carried in suspension along the surface. In soil erosion by water, these processes are largely the result of raindrop splash, tur­bulence of moving water caused by raindrops and flowing water.

We examined the effects of forest floor coverage on overland flow generation and soil erosion in mature Japanese cypress plantations with different Cited by: Land degradation, particularly soil erosion, is currently a major challenge for Nepal. With a high rate of population growth, subsistence-based rural economy, and increasingly intense rainfall events in the monsoon season, Nepal is prone to several forms of land degradation, such as floods, landslides, and soil erosion. To understand the causes, impacts, and possible Cited by: 8. 1. Introduction. Rainfall increases the pore water pressure or soil water content of unsaturated shallow soil deposits, and may induce different types of flow-like mass movements (Hutchinson, ), including hyperconcentrated flows (Costa, , Coussot and Meunier, ) and first-time shallow slides that turn into debris flows, the latter defined as “a very rapid to extremely rapid Cited by: J.E. Gilley, in Encyclopedia of Soils in the Environment, Introduction. Water erosion is caused by the detachment and transport of soil by rainfall, runoff, melting snow or ice, and irrigation. Excessive erosion can threaten the production of agricultural and forest products. Erosion may also impact water conveyance and storage structures, and contribute to pollution .